Gevo, Praj Industries to develop SAF in India

Source: By Biofuels International • Posted: Thursday, August 20, 2020

Gevo and Praj Industries have signed a binding, definitive master framework agreement (MFA) to collaborate on providing sustainable aviation fuel (SAF).

The agreement will see the firms develop renewable, low carbon, low particulate SAF and renewable premium petrol in India and neighbouring countries. The news follows an earlier announcement in April 2019 between both parties regarding the commercialisation of renewable isobutanol, SAF, and renewable premium petrol.

Gevo will license its technology and Praj will provide technology, plant equipment and EPC services to sugar mills and ethanol plants to produce renewable isobutanol from 1G feedstock (cane juice, cane molasses, sugar syrup) and 2G feedstock (cellulosic biomass such as straw, bagasse).

The renewable isobutanol will be aggregated and transferred to various refineries. The two firms will also offer their services to refineries to convert renewable isobutanol into SAF and premium petrol through the ASTM-approved pathway of alcohol-to-jet.

Dr Pramod Chaudhari, executive chairman of Praj Industries said: “We are happy to partner with Gevo, a leading renewable chemicals and advanced biofuels company, to expand the commercial-scale use of SAF in India.

“Praj’s efinity™ technology under Bio-Mobility™ platform, combined with Gevo’s ATJ, will create a winning solution to address the growing need for sustainable decarbonisation. This will also help India in achieving energy security, reducing import bills, and meeting climate change goals.”

According to the Apte Research Group at the University of California, Berkley, particle air pollution in South Asia ranks among the most severe in the world. In India, hundreds of millions of people are exposed to PM2.5 concentrations, far greater than the World Health Organisation’s guidelines. Using SAF blended with aviation turbine fuel can contribute ‘significantly’ to mitigating the risk associated with particle air pollution, say the firms.

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