Corn, Soybean Planting Slogs on in Waterlogged US Midsection

Source: By Anthony Greder, DTN Staff Reporter • Posted: Wednesday, May 29, 2019

OMAHA (DTN) — Farmers in the waterlogged midsection of the U.S. continued to slowly slog along in planting corn and soybeans last week, but made little headway in narrowing the gap between this year’s progress and the five-year average, according to USDA NASS’ weekly Crop Progress report released Tuesday. The report was delayed a day due to the Memorial Day holiday.

An estimated 58% of U.S. corn was planted as of Sunday, the slowest progress since at least 1980. Corn planting was up 9 percentage points from 49% the previous week but was still well behind 90% at the same time last year and 32 percentage points behind the five-year average of 90%. That was further behind average than in last week’s report when corn planting was 31 percentage points behind the average pace.

“Major corn-producing states with especially slow progress included Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and South Dakota,” said DTN Lead Analyst Todd Hultman.

Corn emergence also continued to be slow with an estimated 32% of the crop emerged as of Sunday, the lowest total for this time of year since 2008. Emergence was far behind 69% last year and 37 percentage points behind the five-year average of 69%. In last week’s report, emergence was 30 percentage points behind the average.

Soybean planting progress continued to fall further behind the average pace. As of Sunday, an estimated 29% of the crop was planted, the slowest progress since 2009, said Hultman. Progress was up 10 percentage points from the previous week but was behind last year’s 74% and 37 percentage points behind the five-year average of 66%. In last week’s report, soybean planting was 28 percentage points behind average. Soybeans emerged was 11%, 24 percentage points behind the average of 35%.

|